News and Press

Gordon Brown: It's time to fund schools for Syrians

13 Feb 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

By Gordon Brown
February 13, 2014 -- Updated 1630 GMT (0030 HKT)

Editor's note: Editor's Note: Gordon Brown is a United Nations Special Envoy on Global Education. He was formerly the UK's prime minister. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of Gordon Brown.

(CNN) -- I had to act. A frail 18-year-old Syrian refugee girl had pleaded: "Why have you abandoned us?" Her apartment in Homs, Syria, had been bombed, her family made homeless, her wheelchair-bound sister thrown out on to the streets with no shelter and no food but also no medical help and no schooling for the girls.

I discovered that before the civil war the girl excelled in sport and chess, had led a youth group and sang with her church choir. Now she had lost her home and her school, and she was rapidly losing hope. She had written in a private letter: "Everything is lost. I feel like I should show you so you will believe me."

And so because of recognition from the Syrian supporters in a school in Wales, she was offered the chance of a scholarship to study in the UK. She has now been here for six months and is thriving.

She works hard because she dreams that one day she can return and make a difference to her war-ravaged country.
Today, UNHCR figures show there are 3 million Syrian children displaced by the conflict, more than 1 million of whom have had to flee their country in what is now a disaster of biblical proportions.

Some years from now the world will look back and ask why so many of us did so little, faced with a catastrophe that has made more people permanently homeless than in the world's worst recent natural disasters, like the Asian tsunami of 2004 and the Haiti earthquake of 2010.

Of the 1 million exiled Syrian children, almost half of them in beleaguered Lebanon, and the mantra of 50 of the world's top anti-poverty advocacy groups and international institutions is simple. "Education cannot wait."

On best estimates they are likely to spend 10 years in camps or temporary shelters. They need food not only when starving, shelter when destitute, medical drugs when faced with the risk of polio. They also need hope -- hope that there is a future worth preparing for. If they are not to lose their childhoods -- a loss that can never be replaced -- the one way to deliver hope is by ensuring they can resume their education.

Amid the chaos there is a plan, a plan conceived in Britain. It puts existing Lebanese schools on double shifts -- starting earlier and finishing later to give more lessons for more pupils -- and offers all 435,000 refugees spread across the country the chance of formal education.
The annual cost is $400 dollars per pupil which is cost-effective because we do not have to create new facilities.
Proof that the double shift system works, albeit on a smaller scale, can be found in a north Lebanese village called Akroum. In a unique effort volunteer Syrian teachers, local Lebanese school heads and a small Scottish charity called Edinburgh Direct Aid, are operating the local school on a timeshare basis outside of normal school hours.

Almost immediately boys and girls who have fled from burnt-down and bombed schools and who were a few weeks ago child laborers or even beggars have started to recover their lost childhood and now have hope that there is something to live for.

The country-wide Lebanese plan can be operational within weeks. And what has been achieved for a few hundred children in Akroum can be now achieved for all 435,000 Syrian child refugees in Lebanon -- if we urgently adopt the plan.

My frustration is that an idea conceived eight months ago, negotiated with the Lebanese Prime Minister six months ago and the subject of two in-depth reports -- one by the respected Overseas Development Institute and another by UNICEF and UNHCR -- is still sitting on a table waiting implementation while children spend a winter walking the streets begging, some now trafficked into prostitution and some even forced into marriage as child brides.

This week the Lebanese prime minister, Najib Azmi Mikati, travels to London to make a plea for his nation and its people. One of the world's smallest countries, Lebanon has been left to shoulder the biggest burden of the crisis and it is unable to cope without international support.
Almost 25% of its entire population are now Syrian refugees. It is the equivalent of 15 million refugees arriving on the shores of the United Kingdom.

The U.S., Norway, Denmark and the UAE have backed the plan, which would cost $195 million dollars a year to secure schooling for the 435,000 children. Now with 50 of the world's top international aid agencies making an urgent plea, today all countries with aid budgets should come on board.

An important principle is at stake. More than 100 years ago, the Red Cross established the principle that the right to health care transcends borders.

Now we can establish that even in war zones children can learn. Some good can yet emerge out of the ruins.

Read the original article on CNN.com.

First UN report on children in Syria’s civil war paints picture of ‘unspeakable’ horrors

6 Feb 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

4 February 2014 – Syrian children have been subjected to "unspeakable" suffering in the nearly three years of civil war, with the Government and allied militia responsible for countless killings, maiming and torture, and the opposition for recruiting youngsters for combat and using terror tactics in civilian areas, according to the first United Nations report on the issue.

Read more: First UN report on children in Syria’s civil war paints picture of ‘unspeakable’ horrors

One in four young people in developing countries unable to read, says UN

30 Jan 2014  |  ROOT - News and Press

'Legacy of illiteracy' costing developing countries billions of dollars a year in wasted education funding, warns Unesco

Claire Provost

One in four young people in developing countries are unable to read a sentence, according to a report, which warns that poor quality education has left a "legacy of illiteracy" more widespread than previously believed.

Read more: One in four young people in developing countries unable to read, says UN

In Bangladesh, learning why children stop learning

28 Jan 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

By Matthieu Cretté

This year – the 25th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child – UNICEF challenges the world to think differently about how to drive change for the world's hardest to reach and most vulnerable children.

 

Read more: In Bangladesh, learning why children stop learning

Girls educated on laws against child marriage

24 Jan 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

Madurai District Legal Services Authority (DLSA) awareness camp: Call toll free number 1098 to report cases of domestic violence

"Adolescent girls need to be aware of laws against child abuse and child marriage as in most cases they fall victims to such abuse," said Jecintha Martin, Secretary, Madurai District Legal Services Authority (DLSA), at an awareness camp here on Wednesday.

Read more: Girls educated on laws against child marriage

World must make ending child marriage a priority – report

18 Jan 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

Author: Emma Batha

LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Jamila was three years old when her parents gave her to another Afghan family for marriage to their son. She was beaten regularly and treated as a slave.

At 10 she was raped by the uncle of her intended husband. Her injuries were so severe she had to be taken to hospital. The following year she was forced to marry her rapist. Every night he raped her and then sent her to sleep in the stable with the animals.

Read more: World must make ending child marriage a priority – report

Religious Hostilities Reach Six-Year High

17 Jan 2014  |  ROOT - News and Press

The share of countries with a high or very high level of social hostilities involving religion reached a six-year peak in 2012, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center. A third (33%) of the 198 countries and territories included in the study had high religious hostilities in 2012, up from 29% in 2011 and 20% as of mid-2007. Religious hostilities increased in every major region of the world except the Americas. The sharpest increase was in the Middle East and North Africa, which still is feeling the effects of the 2010-11 political uprisings known as the Arab Spring.1 There also was a significant increase in religious hostilities in the Asia-Pacific region, where China edged into the "high" category for the first time.

Read more: Religious Hostilities Reach Six-Year High

World Economic Forum warns of dangers in growing inequality, extreme weather

17 Jan 2014  |  ROOT - News and Press

* Ahead of Davos meeting, forum warns of "lost" generation

* Widening wealth gap ranked as top global risk in 2014

* Extreme weather next most likely cause of major shocks

* Threat of fiscal crises significant, but danger receding

Read more: World Economic Forum warns of dangers in growing inequality, extreme weather

Holy See hails “fruitful dialogue” on protecting children’s rights

16 Jan 2014  |  ROOT - News and Press

(Vatican Radio) A Holy See delegation has concluded a hearing at the United Nations on implementing the Convention on the Rights of the Child, describing it as an "important and fruitful, interactive dialogue" on dealing with child protection. 

Read more: Holy See hails “fruitful dialogue” on protecting children’s rights

Joint press release: Global champions and $1 billion investment needed to prevent a lost generation of Syrian children

10 Jan 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

Global champions and $1 billion investment needed to prevent a lost generation of Syrian children

NEW YORK, 7 January 2014 - UNICEF, UNHCR, Save the Children, World Vision and other partners today called for governments, aid agencies and members of the public to become champions for the children of Syria and support the "No Lost Generation" strategy, which aims to provide those affected by the conflict with the chance to shape a more stable and secure future.

 

Read more: Joint press release: Global champions and $1 billion investment needed to prevent a lost...