News and Press

Aid workers must heed local culture to save lives - Red Cross

16 Oct 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation - Thu, 16 Oct 2014 00:01 GMT

 
Author: Megan Rowling
 

BARCELONA, Oct 16 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - When Ebola emerged in West Africa this year, the virus was able to spread so quickly partly because burial rituals in Guinea and Sierra Leone involve washing the dead - and it's been hard to dissuade people from touching infected corpses.

Read more: Aid workers must heed local culture to save lives - Red Cross

Horrific Sexual Violence in South Sudan, UN Envoy Says

13 Oct 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

Women and children in South Sudan have been the victims of horrific sexual violence since the country plunged into conflict 10 months ago, the UN Secretary General’s Special Envoy on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Zainab Bangura, said after a week-long visit.

Read more: Horrific Sexual Violence in South Sudan, UN Envoy Says

A cycle of violence: ‘Girls routinely married off for money’

13 Oct 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

PESHAWAR: After one of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa’s (K-P) own made it to the world headlines hours before the International Day of the Girl Child, it seems the province has a lot to achieve for its girls.

Read more: A cycle of violence: ‘Girls routinely married off for money’

Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi Are Awarded Nobel Peace Prize

10 Oct 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

By ALAN COWELL and DECLAN WALSH

OCT. 10, 2014

Reaching across gulfs of age, gender, faith, nationality and even international celebrity, the Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded the 2014 peace prize on Friday to Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan and Kailash Satyarthi of India. The award joined a teenage Pakistani known around the world with an Indian veteran of campaigns to end child labor and free children from trafficking.

The award was announced in Oslo by Thorbjorn Jagland, the committee’s chairman, who said: “The Nobel Committee regards it as an important point for a Hindu and a Muslim, an Indian and a Pakistani, to join in a common struggle for education and against extremism.”

Read more: Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi Are Awarded Nobel Peace Prize

Engaging youth to combat Ebola

9 Oct 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

By Adva Saldinger09 October 2014

 

The tragedy of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa extends beyond the immediate lives lost to the disease; it has impacts on a generation of youth living through the crisis — young people who in the case of Guinea are being trained to help stem the disease.

The government in Conakry has recently trained 2,000 youth volunteers to go from door to door to educate households about the reality of Ebola, how it is transmitted and how they can protect themselves to counter the mass hysteria created by the misinformation in the media, Guinea Minister of Youth and Youth Employment Moustapha Naite told Devex.

Key to the success, Naite explained, is that the youth are volunteers — had they been paid, there would have been speculation and mistrust. In addition, with such a young population — 62 percent of Guineans are under 25, according to CIA’s World Factbook — they are more likely to trust the information when they hear it from fellow young people.

So far, the intervention has proven to be successful, and in the coming weeks the government plans to scale up the program, training an additional 8,000 youth as volunteers and expanding throughout the country.

“Youth is so critical because one, they are the ones that usually are at the front of all the violence, second, they are usually the ones that don’t believe in things and third, they represent a force,” Niate said in an interview at Making Cents International’s Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit held this week in Washington, D.C.

The minister was there to talk about ambitions and programs the government were undertaking to support youth entrepreneurship and create jobs — efforts which have been largely put on hold to fight Ebola.

“This is like a national disaster happening in our country,” Naite said. “[But] it’s more dangerous than having a tropical storm coming through because that comes once and it’s finished. This one is there and stays for a while and it kills slowly.”

There should now be a laser focus by the international community to contain and eradicate the disease, he said. NGOs can help, as the government needs help from everyone, especially in serving the needs of the poorest citizens who may be struggling with basic survival and unable to find work or food because of quarantines.

Food insecurity, the lack of opportunities and fear can be a dangerous combination, and Naite acknowledged that it could very well lead to unrest, like what has already happened in Liberia, another Ebola-affected country in West Africa.

“People are looking to have an environment where they can prosper,” he said. “If the government cannot respond to their needs, desires, aspirations then of course it can lead to unrest.”

Creating opportunities for education and jobs will be critical in providing a better, more stable future but Ebola is likely to cast a long shadow, especially as the isolation and stigmatization it has brought limit investment and economic growth.

Read the original article at devex.com.

 

On World Habitat Day, UN calls for 'new urban agenda'

6 Oct 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

 

6 October 2014 – Urgent action is needed to refocus urban planning and to provide safe, affordable housing that is appropriate and adequate for our citizens' growing needs, senior United Nations officials said marking World Habitat Day, which is observed annually on the first Monday of October.

 

Read more: On World Habitat Day, UN calls for 'new urban agenda'

Most countries could miss their Milliennium Goals for decreasing child mortality rates

1 Oct 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

 

MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS to reduce child mortality for the under fives by as much as two-thirds look likely to be missed in most countries, researchers have said.

The warning comes as a new report, published in The Lancet, found that the leading causes of death in this age group are preterm birth complications and pneumonia.

A US-led study of 6.3 million deaths found these two causes each accounted for 15%.

 

Read more: Most countries could miss their Milliennium Goals for decreasing child mortality rates

Comments by Dr.Vinya Ariyaratne, General Secretary of Sarvodaya Shramadana Movement, Sri Lanka

1 Oct 2014  |  News and Press - World Day News

I am a lay Buddhist. I represent the Sarvodaya Shramadana Movement of Sri Lanka which is by far the most widespread grassroots people’s organization which is engaged in integrated/holistic community development, peace building and reconciliation covering the entire country. The development philosophy of the Savodaya movement is based on Buddhist teachings and Gandhian principles but it works across all ethnic and religious communities in Sri Lanka.

Read more: Comments by Dr.Vinya Ariyaratne, General Secretary of Sarvodaya Shramadana Movement, Sri Lanka

Clinton Announces Global Initiative to Educate Girls

24 Sep 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

 

VOA News

Read more: Clinton Announces Global Initiative to Educate Girls

From the Mouths of Babes: Children on the Frontlines of Climate Change

18 Sep 2014  |  News and Press - Related News

Program Manager for Climate Change Adaptation at Plan International Australia

Posted: Updated: 

When you think about climate change, what do you think about? Disasters? Rising sea-levels? The future of polar bears?

Through my work in developing countries, children and young people tell me they don't just think about future consequences; the impacts of climate change are affecting them now.

Read more: From the Mouths of Babes: Children on the Frontlines of Climate Change